Form And Function

10 11 orson squire fowlerToday is the birthday of Ogden Squire Fowler, who was born in Cohocton, New York in 1809. You may not have heard of him, but he was pretty famous in the mid-nineteenth century for his work in phrenology. Fowler had begun his adult life on a different course. He had walked four hundred miles to attend Amherst College in Massachusetts to train for a career in the Church. But then he attended a lecture by Johann Spuzheim, a Viennese doctor who was one of the leading proponents of Phrenology. This was at a time when people were just beginning to understand that different areas of the brain were responsible for different functions. The idea behind Phrenology was that every personality characteristic was governed by a different area of the brain. That meant that if a person had an abundance of a particular characteristic, such as benevolence or firmness, that area of the brain would be larger, resulting in a bump in the skull. Fowler was fascinated, he was soon reading the skulls of his fellow students at two cents a time.

10 11 phrenologyAfter leaving college he travelled the country, lecturing on Phrenology and reading heads. He was soon accompanied by his brother Lorenzo and they eventually set up a practice in New York. They were later joined by their sister Charlotte. It was quite the family affair and when Lorenzo married a doctor, Lydia Folger, she gave some medical credence to their operation. It was hugely popular and they had a lot of famous clients including President James Garfield and the author Walt Whitman. Despite only charging a dollar for an examination and three dollars for a written report, they were soon pretty wealthy. Fowler branched out into publishing, writing a book and also a magazine on the subject.

Phrenology though, was not really enough for him and he began to think that he could improve other areas of peoples lives. He also produced books about health, religion and oddly, architecture. Fowler’s own head bumps had led him to believe that he would be a pretty good architect. He was particularly enamoured of the octagonal house. An eight sided house allowed for more windows and this meant more light, less dark corners and a free flow of air around the house. A central staircase would also allow air to circulate more easily and he felt this would make the house easier to heat in cold weather and to keep cool in the summer. Fowler was not a fan of internal hallways, he preferred a veranda, which meant going outside to get to the next room. He wrote ‘A Home for All, or A New, Cheap, Convenient, and Superior Mode of Building.’ in 1848. He claimed that they provided more interior space and were cheaper to build, though this was largely because he favoured poured concrete walls over brick or stone.

10 11 octagon houseFowler built his own octagonal house at Fishkills, New York. It was massive. It was ninety feet tall, had four storeys and sixty rooms. It had a cistern on the roof to collect rainwater. Inside it had a dumb waiter to bring food from the kitchen in the basement and speaking tubes to allow communication around the house. I do love a speaking tube. Fowler’s ideas led to hundreds, maybe thousands of octagonal houses being built all over the United States in the mid eighteenth century.

Ogden Squire Fowler really began to fall out of favour when he published what was basically a sex manual with the catchy title of ‘Sexuality Restored And Warning And Advice To Youth Against Perverted Amativeness: Including Its Prevention And Remedies As Taught By Phrenology And Physiology’. I haven’t been able to find out much about it. It seems to have approached the subject by looking at it in the light of having children and raising them to healthy and respectable adults. One of the chapter titles is: ‘How young husbands should treat their brides; how to increase their love and avoid shocking them.’ He thought that women should enjoy sex and absolutely not wear corsets, both of which were quite shocking notions at the time. This, and the fact that he also lectured on the subject, really spoiled his reputation. He was accused of giving “private lectures to ladies…of an immoral character—often grossly obscene in action and speech,” and the Chicago Tribune said that he: “disseminated the seeds of vice” under the “cloak of science” which conjures up an interesting image.

However, he didn’t really want people to get too carried away by sex, basically his message seems to have been that people should enjoy themselves but not too much. Depravity should definitely be avoided, as this could lead to couples having weak and sickly children. This was not well received, particularly by the parents of weak and sickly children.

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